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China Matters documents stories of Global Photographers’ COVID-19 Observation

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By October 22, the world saw 41 million confirmed cases of COVID-19, according to the WHO official website. Among them 8.65 million cases were found in the US.

Photographers around the world are exploring and telling real stories related to the pandemic through their lens.  

Duan Wei, a photo journalist from China Pictorial, stayed in Wuhan for more than two months with a group of four, capturing the moments of how doctors and nurses work on the frontline.

“I think it’s a chance for them to communicate with each other,” said Duan. “They had little time to rest.”

He was also covering the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008, but what he saw in Wuhan was even more stunning to him, as he said “you can’t see where the danger is.”

Ashraf Fawzy, an Egyptian photographer, captured the scene of a little girl sitting on a luggage, waiting to go through quarantine inspection. She is a refugee from Kuwait.

This video was produced by China Matters. It documents different stories of three photographers from China, Egypt and South Korea, who were dedicated to demonstrating people’s real life from different areas in the world through their lens.

- Video is available at AP Multimedia Newsroom (http://www.apmultimedianewsroom.com) –

To view this video from www.youtube.com, please give your consent at the top of this page.Covid-19 through the lense

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Contact:

Li Siwei
Tel: 008610-68996566
E-mail: lisiwei5125@gmail.com
Facebook: https://business.facebook.com/watch/?v=313395346373930
YouTube: https://youtu.be/8u2VvqX3n3c

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